• classic wedding cake Blissful Collection - Classic
    120 portions. £295
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
  • diamonds wedding cake Blissful Collection - Diamonds
    120 portions. £295
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
  • flowers wedding cake Blissful Collection - Flowers
    120 portions. £295
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
  • wedding cake Bespoke Wedding Cake
    by Nyree
  • hearts wedding cake Blissful Collection - Hearts
    120 portions. £295
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
  • lace wedding cake Blissful Collection - Lace Veil
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
    120 portions. £295
  • pearls and swirls wedding cake Blissful Collection - Pearls & Swirls
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
    120 portions. £295
  • pearls wedding cake Blissful Collection - Pearls
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
    120 portions. £295
  • polca dot wedding cake Bespoke Wedding Cake
    by Nyree
  • spots wedding cake Blissful Collection - Spots
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
    120 portions. £295
  • spring rain wedding cake Blissful Collection - Spring Rain
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
    120 portions. £295
  • plain white wedding cake Blissful Collection - Plain White
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
    120 portions. £295
  • snow flake wedding cake Blissful Collection - Snow Flake
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
    120 portions. £295
  • stripes wedding cake Blissful Collection - Stripes
    Cake Stand & flowers not included
    120 portions. £295

About Wedding Cakes

Wedding cakes may now come in a wide range of shapes, sizes and colours but the rituals and traditions surrounding them have changed little down the centuries. As symbols of fertility and good fortune, wedding cakes have been important features of wedding celebrations since ancient times.

 

Early wedding cakes were simple, single- tiered cakes. As baking technology evolved, multi-tiered cakes supported on pillars began to form the centre piece at wedding receptions. Fruitcakes are still popular and many couples like to follow the tradition of keeping part of the cake to be eaten following the birth of their first child. If you decide to do this, you will need a rich fruitcake at your wedding.

 

Cutting the cake is the first ‘official’ task that a newly married couple perform as man and wife. This is one of the reasons why the cake takes pride and place at their wedding reception, where it is often displayed on a pedestal of its own. The cake needs to be visible to all the guests when the best man, or Master of Ceremonies, announces that it is about to be cut.

 

Tradition holds that the first slice should be cut by the bride. In days gone by it was known as the ‘bride cake’ and the white icing of traditional wedding cakes mirrored the bride’s traditional white wedding gown. Her husband usually assists by laying his hand over hers as she cuts the cake and if he is a member of the armed forces marrying in uniform, he sometimes offers his sword to cut the wedding cake.

 

Once the first slice has been cut, the cake is taken away to be cut into portions. A wedding featuring a three-tiered cake,the bottom and largest tier is cut into pieces to be served at the reception. The middle tier, may be served to guests, while other portions are set aside to be sent to those unable to attend the wedding.

 

As well as bringing luck to the eater, a piece of wedding cake is said to give a glimpse of a future husband. At one time a small piece of cake was passed through a wedding ring, up to nine times depending on which local tradition was being observed. Placed under a girl’s pillow as she slept, the morsel of cake was said to bring her a dream of her future husband.

 

In parts of England a plate of cake was thrown over the head of a newly married bride as she returned from the church. Tradition held that the greater the number of pieces the plate broke into, the happier the marriage would be; some went as far as suggesting that the number of pieces indicated the number of children the couple would have. At the same time guests would gather up the cake that had been thrown for the good luck that would bring them.


Wedding Favours - Carefully chosen and appealingly presented wedding favours are another popular way of making guests feel welcome, as well as serving the practical purpose of indicating which seat they should occupy at their table.

 

Small gifts given by a bride to her female guests as mementoes of her wedding have long been part of tradition. These generally took the form of bonbonnieres, symbolising health, wealth, happiness, long life and fertility. From these the practice of giving a wedding favour has developed, often in the form of a single gift presented as an individual place setting. Although wedding favours were traditionally confined to female guests, today an increasing number of brides are presenting them to male guests alike.